Riverside Art Museum Welcomes Home Rising Artist, Brenna Youngblood

Riverside Art Museum Welcomes Home Rising Artist, Brenna Youngblood

Riverside

The Riverside Art Museum (RAM) is presenting an exhibition by Brenna Youngblood titled “Lavender Rainbow.” The exhibit opened February 1 and will run through March 29, 2020.  Youngblood’s work explores issues of African American identity and representation and often references historically significant moments and organizations in African American history. An example is her 2017 sculpture M.I.A. that refers to the Montgomery Improvement Association—a group co-organized by Martin Luther King, Jr., to guide the Montgomery bus boycott protest in 1955.”  “RAM is very fortunate to showcase Brenna’s work,” said RAM Executive Director Drew Oberjuerge, “particularly because she was born in Riverside. We are grateful for the work of Lisa Henry to guest curate this exhibition.” “Brenna Youngblood’s work is both complex and beautiful,” added Henry. “While her mixed media pieces fit into the history of the Southern California tradition of assemblage, her work has a unique feel. She pushes the boundaries of the diverse media that she employs.” Henry said she views the exhibition as a wonderful opportunity for audiences in the Inland Empire to experience the range of Brenna’s work, from her early photographs, to mixed media panels, wooden sculptures, and her impressive abstract painted canvases. Youngblood received the 2015 Seattle Art Museum Gwendolyn Knight/Jacob Lawrence Prize, the 2014 The Hermitage Artist Retreat, Englewood, FL, and the 2012 Los Angeles County Museum of Art Young Talent Award/AHAN Award.

Header Photo: Artist Brenna Youngblood

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