Margie and Richard Webster Memorialized Together After 65 Years of Marriage

Margie and Richard Webster Memorialized Together After 65 Years of Marriage

Pomona – Margie and Richard “Dick” Webster died within three days of each other after a lifetime of being together having a family, working together in church, and in the community of Pomona. They were both 83 years old and had been married for 65 years. Margie was born on June 30, and Dick was born on April 2, 1934. 

Anyone who knew the Websters knew of their concern for each other’s health. Dick remained concerned about Margie until her death. Most people didn’t know Dick was himself very ill. 

He was born in Greenville, Tennessee and she was born in Baileyton, Tennessee and met in their teens. Shortly after graduating from high school they were married. They eventually moved to Pomona where they raised their family of four children while being active in numerous community organizations. 

Dick was a successful Hospital Administrator at Children’s Orthopedic Hospital and Kaiser Permanente, retiring nearly 20 years ago. Margie retired from nursing at Lanterman Hospital in Pomona. She was also very active at Primm AME Church where she sang in the choir for many years. 

He was active in church as well. He was the co-founder of the Fifty-One Percenter’s community organization that worked on equal opportunity and was a leader in the Brotherhood Fellowship meeting and they rarely missed church. 

“He was so proficient in management of people and in housekeeping that he was asked to come back as a consultant for the Southern California Region out of the Pasadena office,” said Hardy Brown who worked closely with him at Kaiser, Fontana. “Dick was a master of words and would often spar with his boss Frank Bochman. He was a self taught wordsmith,” he said. 

They were devoted parents. Dick was a coach for his children’s sport’s teams and took pride in his role as a mentor to so many of the youth in Pomona. Margie was at every game and recital for her children, grandchildren and great grands, loving, encouraging and giving support to each one.

Left to mourn their memory: daughter Brenda Galloway; sons Cornell, Jeffery and Stanley Webster; daughter-in-laws Corinne, Angelia; Georgette; thirteen grandchildren, Shae, Musiic, Roque, Chanta, Aisha, Janeka, Jeffrey Jr, Stanley Jr, Mystie, Candess, Milan, Kailon, Kaliff and 13 great grandchildren, Margie’s brother, William Watterson and sister, Dot Adams; Richard’s sisters Marilyn Kyle, Nancy Anderson and brother Bobby Webster and an adopted daughter Linda Berry and a host of other relatives and friends.

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