Home » Point of View » In My Opinion » Hardy Brown’s Voter Guide

Hardy Brown’s Voter Guide

by admin on 15th-October-2016
Hardy L. Brown. Photo by Benoit Malphettes

Hardy L. Brown. Photo by Benoit Malphettes

San Bernardino and Riverside County Voter Information Guides for the November 8, 2016 Presidential General Election have been delivered to the post office and early voting for the election began at the Elections Office on Monday, October 10. 

If you have not been keeping up with national, state, and local campaign discussions you have missed many critical issues that you should be aware of as well as candidates you should be critical of when considering who deserves your vote. Like Donald Trump, some have openly stated positions against minorities, women, people with disabilities and Muslims while other candidates –even those on the local level — have used more subtle language to convey the same message, using phrases like “them versus us” or “Obamacare verses Affordable Care Act.” Please give more consideration to people who have a history of inclusion before you vote. I now offer you my recommendations on people, propositions and local measures to support:

Hillary Clinton, U.S. President 

Kamala Harris, U.S. Senate 

Norma Torres, U.S. House of Representatives, District 35 

Pete Aguilar, U.S. House of Representatives, District 31 

Mark Takano, U.S. House of Representatives, District 41

Richard Roth, State Senate, District 31 

Abigail Medina, State Assembly, District 40 

Cheryl Brown, State Assembly, District 47 

Freddie Rodriguez, State Assembly, District 52 

Jose Medina, State Assembly, District 61 

Chuck Washington, Riverside County Supervisor, 3rd District 

Denise Fleming, Mayor, Moreno Valley 

Tonya Burke, Mayor, Perris 

Rita Rodgers, City Council, Perris 

Governing Board of the San Bernardino Community College District 

Paul Rasso, District 1 

Gloria Macias Harrison, District 5 

San Bernardino County School Board 

Laura Mancho, Area C 

Fontana 

BarBara Chavez, School Board 

Lorena Corona, School Board 

Lydia Salazar-Wilbert, City Council 

Jesus Sandoval, City Council 

Colton 

Carolina Padilla, City Clerk 

Arrellio De La Torres, Treasurer 

Frank Navarro, City Council, Dist. 3 

Sarah Zamora, City Council, Dist. 6 

Grand Terrace 

Sylvia Robles, City Council 

William Hussey, City Council 

Rialto 

Deborah Robertson, Mayor 

Rafael Trujillo, City Council 

Jesse Aguayo, City Council 

Barbara McGee, City Clerk 

Edward Carrillo, Treasurer 

San Bernardino Municipal Water District 

Ed Kilgore, Division 1 

Randall Ceniceros, Division 2 

San Bernardino City 

Yes on Measure L, Help fix the city with a new charter 

No on Measure N, regulates medical marijuana use 

Yes on Measure O regulates all aspects of marijuana use in the city 

No on Measure P regulates the establishment for marijuana businesses 

Riverside City 

Yes on Measure O, Riverside Schools facilities funding 

Summary of 17 State Propositions 

51- YES-Authorizes $9 billion in general obligation bonds for new construction and modernization of K–12 public school facilities; charter schools and vocational education facilities; and California Community Colleges facilities. 

52-YES-Extends indefinitely an existing statute that imposes fees on hospitals to fund Medi-Cal health care services, care for uninsured patients, and children’s health coverage.

53-No-Requires statewide voter approval before any revenue bonds can be issued or sold by the state for certain projects if the bond amount exceeds $2 billion. 

54-No-Prohibits the Legislature from passing any bill unless published on the Internet for 72 hours before the vote. Requires Legislature to record its proceedings and post on the Internet. People are clamoring for more transparency but this will only be used by special interests to brow beat legislators at the last minute before voting and not the average poor citizen that they claim to help.

55-Yes-Extends by twelve years the temporary personal income tax increases enacted in 2012 on earnings over $250,000, with revenues allocated to K–12 schools, California Community Colleges, and, in certain years, healthcare. 

56-No-Increases cigarette tax by $2.00 per pack, with equivalent increase on other tobacco products and electronic cigarettes containing nicotine

57-Yes-Allows parole consideration for nonviolent felons. Authorizes sentence credits for rehabilitation, good behavior, and education. 

58-Yes-Preserves requirement that public schools ensure students obtain English language proficiency. Requires school districts to solicit parent/community input in developing language acquisition programs. Requires instruction to ensure English acquisition as rapidly and effectively as possible. Authorizes school districts to establish dual–language immersion programs for both native and non–native English speakers. 

59-Yes-Asks whether California's elected officials should use their authority to propose and ratify an amendment to the federal Constitution overturning the United States Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. Citizens United ruled that laws placing certain limits on political spending by corporations and unions are unconstitutional. 

60-Yes-Requires adult film performers to use condoms during filming of sexual intercourse. Requires producers to pay for performer vaccinations, testing, and medical examinations. Requires producers to post condom requirement at film sites. 

61-No-Prohibits state from buying any prescription drug from a drug manufacturer at price over lowest price paid for the drug by United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Exempts managed care programs funded through Medi–Cal. 

62-Yes-Repeals the death penalty and replaces it with life imprisonment without possibility of parole. Applies retroactively to existing death sentences. Increases the portion of life inmates' wages that may be applied to victim restitution. 

63-No-Requires background check and Department of Justice authorization to purchase ammunition. Prohibits possession of large–capacity ammunition magazines. Establishes procedures for enforcing laws prohibiting firearm possession by specified persons. Requires Department of Justice's participation in federal National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The California Police Chiefs Assn. has decided to oppose Proposition 63, arguing the gun control measure that will be on California's ballot “fails to meet the appropriate balance between public safety and individual gun rights.”

64-No-Legalizes marijuana under state law, for use by adults 21 or older. Imposes state taxes on sales and cultivation. Provides for industry licensing and establishes standards for marijuana products. Allows local regulation and taxation. 

65-No-Redirects money collected by grocery and certain other retail stores through mandated sale of carryout bags. Requires stores to deposit bag sale proceeds into a special fund to support specified environmental projects. 

66-No-Changes procedures governing state court challenges to death sentences. Designates superior court for initial petitions and limits successive petitions. Requires appointed attorneys who take noncapital appeals to accept death penalty appeals. Exempts prison officials from the existing regulation process for developing execution methods. 

67-Yes-A "Yes" vote approves, and a "No" vote rejects, a statute that prohibits grocery and other stores from providing customers single–use plastic or paper carryout bags but permits sale of recycled paper bags and reusable bags.

Category: In My Opinion.
Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *