Exploring London Together

Exploring London Together

Redlands

A combined group of students from the University of Redlands and Tuskegee University recently spent three weeks documenting the sights of London for a study abroad course on storytelling.  During the trip the group learned about the region’s history, politics, and culture and how these elements can come together in photos and narrative. The youth also shared personal experiences and perspectives. Together, this made for a meaningful international learning experience.  In addition to taking photographs, the students spent time in Liverpool and Brighton learning about British history, from the country’s slave trade to the Beatles, Brexit, and immigration. “Having U of R and Tuskegee students on the trip together was magical,” says Art Professor Tommi Cahill. “Each student brought something different to the experience, which allowed them to learn a lot from each other.” The youth were enrolled in the storytelling May Term course and spent a significant time as part of the course making photographs and narrative creations describing their experience in London. Using pens, pencils, journals, digital cameras, smart phones and instamatic cameras they will make a steady production of work (200 photographs a week) along with significant journaling. The photographs and words will have a critique of all the blogs, Instagram feeds and journals. 

Header Photo: The group outside London’s Black Cultural Archives, a center dedicated to collecting and preserving the histories of African people in Britain. (Front row left to right) Brooke Young, Elaine Liu, Karina Cardenas (the artist of the exhibition the group went to see), Franklyn Rodgers, Nina Fletcher, Mariama Fisher, Hannah Thurlow. (Second Row left to right) Marcella Whitehead, Taylor Bains, Emma Tchen, Lauren Lux, Grace Pollard, David Neita (the group’s tour guide), Amy Williamson, Madison Spitzer, Nora Stock, and Allison Fraiberg. (Photo courtesy of Tommi Cahill)

Dr Main Sidebar

ACROBATIC MATHEMATICAL THINKING (6)

A powerful Creative and Critical Thinking exercise is to first learn shapes of the Pyramid, Square, Trapezius, Trapezoid, Rectangle, Triangle, Circle, Octagon, Ellipse, Lunette; study which are Cosmic and/or and human-made; and determine what are indications for using...

MATHEMATICS OF AFRICAN TRADITION FOR BLACK YOUTH (5)

Patterns, Shapes, and Forms are fundamental tools to help one see and give meaning to Real, Surreal, and Unreal Things. These contribute to understanding and the explaining of Principles (unchanging realities), Events (changing realities), Settings, Situations, and...

***AFRICAN UBUNTU IS SPIRITUAL “ME/WE” (1)

“ME/WE” is an: "All for One, One for all" concept of African Zulus, called Ubuntu. The Nguni Bantu define it as connection of all “Humanity”—meaning its “Sameness” creation is the Cosmic Force. They translate it as: “I am because we are”; or “Humanity towards others”...

Share This