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Distracted Driving is Dangerous

by admin on 30th-June-2017

Dr. Ernest Levister

Distracted driving is dangerous, claiming nearly 4,000 lives in the US in 2016 alone. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) leads the national effort to save lives by preventing this dangerous behavior. 

Distracted driving is any activity that takes your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, or your mind off of your primary task of driving safely, potentially endangering the driver, passenger, and bystander safety. Some forms of distracted driving include: 

  • Texting 
  • Using a cell phone or smart phone 
  • Eating and drinking 
  • Talking to passengers 
  • Grooming 
  • Reading, including maps 
  • Using a navigation system 
  • Watching a video 
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player, or MP3 player 

Many distractions exist while driving, but cell phones are a top distraction because so many drivers use them for long periods of time each day. Almost everyone has seen a driver distracted by a cell phone, but when you are the one distracted, you often don't realize that driver is you. 

We can all play a part in the fight to save lives by ending distracted driving.

Teens can be the best messengers with their peers, so we encourage them to speak up when they see a friend driving while distracted, to have their friends sign a pledge to never drive distracted, to become involved in their local Students Against Destructive Decisions chapter, and to share messages on social media that remind their friends, family, and neighbors not to make the deadly choice to drive distracted. 

Parents first have to lead by example—by never driving distracted—as well as have a talk with their young driver about distraction and all of the responsibilities that come with driving. Have everyone in the family sign the pledge to commit to distraction-free driving. Remind your teen driver that in States with graduated driver licensing (GDL), a violation of distracted-driving laws could mean a delayed or suspended license. 

Educators and employers can play a part, too. Spread the word at your school or workplace about the dangers of distracted driving. Ask your students to commit to distraction-free driving or set a company policy on distracted driving. 

If you feel strongly about distracted driving, be a voice in your community by supporting local laws, speaking out at community meetings, and highlighting the dangers of distracted driving on social media and in your local op-ed pages.

Category: Healthy Living.
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